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Will it be possible to record phone calls with the Pro1?  I haven't had much success with my Moto phones, and last time I looked into it I believe it was because Motorola didn't fully implement the audio API in the bundled libaudio.so file.

Could someone from FxTec confirm this, or someone with a prototype try this out (*cough @EskeRahn ūüėÄ)?¬† If you don't know of any apps for this, this is the one I use.

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Just now, mcdinner said:

should work with root all the time.

No, unfortunately even with root if the Android distribution for your phone doesn't have a complete implementation of the audio library call recording will fail.  Having root will just allow you to see the error in logcat, but that's it.

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1 minute ago, Noob said:

No, unfortunately even with root if the Android distribution for your phone doesn't have a complete implementation of the audio library call recording will fail.  Having root will just allow you to see the error in logcat, but that's it.

You can install an app then which enables it.

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Even Screenrecorder apps fail to get the Audio recorded and can only record Mic-sound. I remember DU Screen recorder being one of those, and on stock roms the audio recording feature was only possible with certain manufacturers/OSes. Root helped there.

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Thanks for the replies everyone.  I haven't tried this on a recent version of Android, so I wasn't aware of changes in newer versions that affect this.  I've only tried this with LineageOS 14.1 (Android 7.1) on the Droid 4 and Android 8.0 on the Moto Z, and neither worked even though both phones are rooted.  It's worked previously with unrooted ZTEs and Samsungs (but older Android, around 5.1), so I'm hoping it was just a Moto thing.

18 hours ago, mcdinner said:

You can install an app then which enables it.

Maybe with some phones, but I could never get it to work with the Droid 4.  Tried installing different apps, adding Xposed modules and ALSA libs, still no go.  Always the same error in logcat relating to libaudio.so.

Edited by Noob
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Just a guess, but a reason for device manufacturers to not make call recording available could be legal, rather than technical. Under quite a number of jurisdictions call recording is illegal (without explicit consent of both parties)...

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13 hours ago, Rob. S. said:

Just a guess, but a reason for device manufacturers to not make call recording available could be legal, rather than technical. Under quite a number of jurisdictions call recording is illegal (without explicit consent of both parties)...

Most companies record all calls (not talking mobile here) ūüėĄ

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4 hours ago, _DW_ said:

Most companies record all calls (not talking mobile here) ūüėĄ

Illegal in some countries. I doubt it is allowed in the EU. It is not allowed in Denmark. Often calling a company I get an automated message telling that they want to record "for educational purposes", and is then asked to press say 1 to allow or 2 to disallow before continuing.

Edited by EskeRahn
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49 minutes ago, EskeRahn said:

Illegal in some countries. I doubt it is allowed in the EU. Often calling a company I get an automated message telling that they want to record "for educational purposes", and is then asked to press say 1 to allow or 2 to disallow before continuing.

I work for a company in the EU and they definitely record all calls internal and external. 

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19 minutes ago, _DW_ said:

I work for a company in the EU and they definitely record all calls internal and external. 

Usually customer services here have an automatic warning message that they will record the conversation for the purpose of "quality assurance" and usually they also provide a reference number. There is no option to refuse it just to hung up the call.

However, as far as I know, one should only record the call legally here if the other party has accepted the recording somehow...

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3 hours ago, VaZso said:

Usually customer services here have an automatic warning message that they will record the conversation for the purpose of "quality assurance" and usually they also provide a reference number. There is no option to refuse it just to hung up the call.

However, as far as I know, one should only record the call legally here if the other party has accepted the recording somehow...

In the United States, it is similar.  You'll generally hear, "Your call may be monitored or recorded for quality and training purposes."  In the United States, even though the laws use the term "consent", notification is deemed sufficient.  I'm guessing they feel that if someone is notified and stays on the line, then they are consenting.  

The above is mainly used in business, since they want to be safe regarding calling across state lines, where the laws may be different.  Most states are single party states, meaning that only one person in the phone call has to know it is being recorded.   The person recording can be part of the call or a 3rd party can record, as long as they notify one of the people in the call.  Other states are two party states, which means that all people (not just 2, in the case of more than 2 in a call) must be notified.  If call is placed from a single party state to a two party state, the two party state laws take precedence and all people must be notified.  So even if a business is in a single party state, they must notify everyone, hence the use of that notification recording at the beginning of the calls.

An alternative form of notification is allowed, where a beep is played periodically during the phone call.  I've never been on a call like this, so it can't be too common.

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The subject is really complex ‚Äď Wikipedia¬†has an¬†overview at least for some countries. Laws differ between European nations¬†just as they differ between US-American states. Some countries, some states are fine with one-party consent, others demand two-party consent. The question whether a company is allowed to "record all calls" (without the works council agreeing) is an even more complex matter, because it is affected by labour protection laws, too...

Edited by Rob. S.
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59 minutes ago, Rob. S. said:

The subject is really complex ‚Äď Wikipedia¬†has an¬†overview at least for some countries. Laws differ between European nations¬†just as they differ between US-American states. Some countries, some states are fine with one-party consent, others demand two-party consent. The question whether a company is allowed to "record all calls" (without the works council agreeing) is an even more complex matter, because it is affected by labour protection laws, too...

Yeah it is really complex.  I'm in  a highly regulated industry and the monitoring is to prevent crime.

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On 1/13/2020 at 3:17 PM, Rob. S. said:

Just a guess, but a reason for device manufacturers to not make call recording available could be legal, rather than technical. Under quite a number of jurisdictions call recording is illegal (without explicit consent of both parties)...

While that's possibly true, it's still a silly thing for them to have done if true. That would be much like making cars that won't go faster than 75MPH (130KPH) just because doing so is illegal in most places. You make a tool, and what people do with it later is on them. Very rarely do courts hold opinions diverse to this.

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7 hours ago, silversolver said:

While that's possibly true, it's still a silly thing for them to have done if true. That would be much like making cars that won't go faster than 75MPH (130KPH) just because doing so is illegal in most places. You make a tool, and what people do with it later is on them. Very rarely do courts hold opinions diverse to this.

Have to agree its up to the person to abide by the law of there current location.

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2 hours ago, _DW_ said:

Have to agree its up to the person to abide by the law of there current location.

Luckily it is not ONLY up to the individual to abide to the law in all countries.

There might well be legislation requiring a device to have limitations build in. Just as certain devices are not allowed to be sold without special permits. (e.g. lethal weapon in many countries).

E.g. in Denmark the Scooters sold have to have the maximum speed capped. Of course you are still not allowed to exceed the speed limits for the model say down hill, that part is the users responsibility.

I believe there is an EU legislation that require phones to not go above a certain volume without explicit consent (Android does this for us for the Pro1).

And I'm pretty sure there are legal limits on the sending power from the antennas too.

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9 minutes ago, EskeRahn said:

Luckily it is not ONLY up to the individual to abide to the law in all countries.

There might well be legislation requiring a device to have limitations build in. Just as certain devices are not allowed to be sold without special permits. (e.g. lethal weapon in many countries).

E.g. in Denmark the Scooters sold have to have the maximum speed capped. Of course you are still not allowed to exceed the speed limits for the model say down hill, that part is the users responsibility.

I believe there is an EU legislation that require phones to not go above a certain volume without explicit consent (Android does this for us for the Pro1).

And I'm pretty sure there are legal limits on the sending power from the antennas too.

But device manufacturers should go as far as they possibly can to give users full control, right? I'm sure that the support for call recording could be improved so that it's an easy thing to setup. This way, fxtec would be in the clear while enabling users to make a choice.

And what happened to Denmark? I though you guys were shouting "förbuds-sverige!" all the time? But I bought my scooter uncapped. Sure there's a disclaimer that you're not allowed to drive it on public roads, but who cares..

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10 minutes ago, sdx said:

And what happened to Denmark?

Easy answer: We've gone Nazis! 20% voted on a crypto-nazist party. on second to previous election. Last time the crypto-nazists was 'down' to around 10%, but unfortunately not because the voters got wiser, but because all the classic parties more or less adopted the racism and xenophobia in their policy...

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1 hour ago, EskeRahn said:

Easy answer: We've gone Nazis! 20% voted on a crypto-nazist party. on second to previous election. Last time the crypto-nazists was 'down' to around 10%, but unfortunately not because the voters got wiser, but because all the classic parties more or less adopted the racism and xenophobia in their policy...

That is the story of all of Europe. But big parties should not forget 80% did NOT vote for a nazist party, so going more in that direction has the chance to scare of 80% of people to the other side...
 

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50 minutes ago, Doktor Oswaldo said:

That is the story of all of Europe. But big parties should not forget 80% did NOT vote for a nazist party, so going more in that direction has the chance to scare of 80% of people to the other side...
 

The problem is there are no "other side" here.... But we are getting terrible off topic, my bad. Sorry.

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6 hours ago, sdx said:

But device manufacturers should go as far as they possibly can to give users full control, right?

In general, yes. But companies might not want to advertise an option that makes criminals out of naive users who just don't know the laws about recording calls, which I guess might be a large percentage of the people in those states where the laws demand two-party consent. 

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Being "illegal" means nothing if it isn't enforced, you don't flaunt it, and try to use it for legal leverage. 

Record away, keep it to yourself so that you can avoid jerk offs that don't keep their word, and live the life of a hard criminal . 

Redirecting the topic....

Can someone confirm this please? Thugs like OP and a "friend" of myself would like to know.

Edited by D1ggs
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